Social Psychology Theory and Research

Response 1(2 work cited)
Informed by social psychology theory and research, explain how your colleague’s analysis might differ if applied cross-culturally.
Be sure to support your postings and responses with specific references to the social psychology theory and research. In addition to the Learning Resources, search the Walden Library and/or Internet for peer-reviewed articles to support your post and responses. Use proper APA format and citations, including those in the Learning Resources.
Most economically independent women choose partners who at least have excellent prospects for gainful employment. In the article, “What Makes You Click,” (2010) it states that women use an economical filter for selecting a mate – even today in online dating. Economic independent women usually avoid unemployed drunks and get untied with a person that is bound for success than failure. Even given the economic pickiness of most women, some set much more stringent criteria than others, and it helps if they have high mate value themselves. The propinquity theory shows that women are also drawn to people who are similar in terms of ethnicity, politics, and even religion. Research has found that long-term relationships show that partners are remarkably similar in almost every trait. The article by Hirsch et al. (2010) states that women are also attracted to other signs of social status, from elite diction to driving expensive care or dining at a posh restaurant. Most women still prefer that the man pays for the date because this is a sign of having success and disposable income. Although women can be economically independent, they look for signs of the same social status and economic independence on the partner’s part.
In my opinion, biological and cultural constructs both have an impact on the rules of attraction. However, there has been refuted regarding the evolutionary theory. The evolutionary theory claims that men and women have different agendas when it comes to mate selection. In this theory, women claim to choose men based on reproduction while the men claim to choose women based on the success measured by the quantity of their offspring (Aronson, E. et al. (Eds.), 2019).). Since this theory is based on reproduction, this theory does not fit because there are lower birth rates than average. People are waiting to be successful and financial responsibility before having a child. Some couples are not even considering reproducing. The processing of finding a romantic partner varies around the world; in some countries, a long-term relationship is formed by the parents. These relationships are usually based on economic and social status within the community. These types of relationships are cultural constructs. Biological constructs are more Western-based than in other cultures. These are relationships where a person chooses a relationship based on biological feelings such as shortness of breath or butterflies in the stomach. Both of these constructs have an impact on the rules of attraction: a culture based on collectivistic culture while biological is based on individualism. Thus, it appears that romantic love is nearly universal in the human species, but cultural rules alter how that emotional state is experienced, expressed, and remembered (Aronson, E. et al. (Eds.), 2019).
Aronson, E., Wilson, T. D., Akert, R. M., & Sommers, S. R. (Eds.). (2019). Social psychology (10th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.
Hitsch, G. J., Hortacsu, A., & Ariely, D. (2006). What Makes You Click? Mate Preferences and Matching Outcomes in Online Dating. SSRN Electronic Journal. DOI: 10.2139/ssrn.895442
Response 2(2 work cited)
If you were Brenda, how might you have solicited help from one of the many bystanders? Your explanation must be informed by social psychology theory and research.
Be sure to support your postings and responses with specific references to the social psychology theory and research. In addition to the Learning Resources, search the Walden Library and/or Internet for peer-reviewed articles to support your post and responses. Use proper APA format and citations, including those in the Learning Resources.
An explanation about why none of the onlookers offered their assistance. Your explanation must be informed by social psychology theory and research.
Sometimes there are different factors that make onlookers not intervene. In Brenda’s scenario, I believed that the reason why anyone did not help her when she fell headfirst by someone pushing her was that other people thought that someone else would help her. This is known by Diffusion of Responsibility. This is the notion that individuals assume someone else will take responsibility for it—so no one does. (The Diffusion of Responsibility, 2018). I also believed that because she was not paying attention, she resulted in bumping into someone who got upset and pushed her because she was not watching where she was going. Some people may view that as acceptable behavior to push someone who bumps into them because they are not paying attention which can lead someone else to get hurt. This is the same as the bystander effect. That someone assumes that someone else will help or step, which results in no one stepping in. Another factor that can contribute to onlookers not offering their assistance could be that individuals may feel that it is not their business to intervene or that Brenda who fell headfirst would be more upset if someone helped her due to being extremely embarrassed. some onlookers may have experienced helping another person that led to them either getting hurt in the process or having the person that they help be rude to them because they may not like sympathy from others.
Reference
The Diffusion Of Responsibility. (2018). Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/happiness-in-world/201006/the-diffusion-responsibility
Learning Resources
Required Readings
Aronson, E., Wilson, T. D., Akert, R. M., & Sommers, S. R. (Eds.). (2019). Social psychology (10th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.
• Chapter 10, “Attraction and Relationships: From Initial Impressions to Long-Term Intimacy”
• Chapter 11, “Prosocial Behavior: Why Do People Help?”
Darley, J. M., & Latané, B. (1968). Bystander intervention in emergencies: Diffusion of responsibility. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 8(4), 377–383. http://dx.doi.org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1037/h0025589
Latané, B., & Darley, J. M. (1968). Group inhibition of bystander intervention in emergencies. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 10(3), 215–221. http://dx.doi.org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1037/h0026570
Required Media
Coolpsychologist. (2009, June 9). The bystander effect [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OSsPfbup0ac
Note: This media program is approximately 3 minutes.
Learning Resources
Required Readings
Aronson, E., Wilson, T. D., Akert, R. M., & Sommers, S. R. (Eds.). (2019). Social psychology (10th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.
• Chapter 10, “Attraction and Relationships: From Initial Impressions to Long-Term Intimacy”
• Chapter 11, “Prosocial Behavior: Why Do People Help?”
Darley, J. M., & Latané, B. (1968). Bystander intervention in emergencies: Diffusion of responsibility. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 8(4), 377–383. http://dx.doi.org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1037/h0025589
Latané, B., & Darley, J. M. (1968). Group inhibition of bystander intervention in emergencies. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 10(3), 215–221. http://dx.doi.org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1037/h0026570
Required Media
Coolpsychologist. (2009, June 9). The bystander effect [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OSsPfbup0ac
Note: This media program is approximately 3 minutes.
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